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Stuff don't ride each other

Jul 17 '14
robdelaney:

juliavickerman:

juliavickerman:

"Colby"

Reblogging my own drawing cuz I’m a dumb proud fuck and I really like Amy Poehler.

This is fucking hot.

robdelaney:

juliavickerman:

juliavickerman:

"Colby"

Reblogging my own drawing cuz I’m a dumb proud fuck and I really like Amy Poehler.

This is fucking hot.

Jul 14 '14
crankyskirt:

The Life & Times of Doris Payne: A Tale of Carats, Cons, and Creating Your Own American Dream

Find out how a poor, single, African-American mother from segregated 1930s America winds up as one of the world’s most notorious and successful jewel thieves.
A glamorous 83-year-old, Doris Payne is as unapologetic today about the $2 million in jewels she’s stolen over a 60-year career as she was the day she stole her first carat. With Doris now on trial for the theft of a department store diamond ring, we probe beneath her consummate smile to uncover the secrets of her trade and what drove her to a life of crime. Stylized recreations, an extensive archive and candid interviews reveal how Payne managed to jet-set her way into any Cartier or Tiffany’s from Monte Carlo to Japan and walk out with small fortunes. This sensational portrait exposes a rebel who defies society’s prejudices and pinches her own version of the American Dream while she steals your heart.

You damn right, I’m watching this. Shit, I’m pissed that a crew of chicks hasn’t made a concept album in tribute to this woman. #femmeoutlaw
Especially since black criminals have so often been characterized as brutish and ignorant, while jewel theft is lionized as a crime for sophisticated masterminds who outsmart authorities (read: smartypants white dudes who do Mission Impossible type shit).

crankyskirt:

The Life & Times of Doris Payne: A Tale of Carats, Cons, and Creating Your Own American Dream

Find out how a poor, single, African-American mother from segregated 1930s America winds up as one of the world’s most notorious and successful jewel thieves.

A glamorous 83-year-old, Doris Payne is as unapologetic today about the $2 million in jewels she’s stolen over a 60-year career as she was the day she stole her first carat. With Doris now on trial for the theft of a department store diamond ring, we probe beneath her consummate smile to uncover the secrets of her trade and what drove her to a life of crime. Stylized recreations, an extensive archive and candid interviews reveal how Payne managed to jet-set her way into any Cartier or Tiffany’s from Monte Carlo to Japan and walk out with small fortunes. This sensational portrait exposes a rebel who defies society’s prejudices and pinches her own version of the American Dream while she steals your heart.

You damn right, I’m watching this. Shit, I’m pissed that a crew of chicks hasn’t made a concept album in tribute to this woman. #femmeoutlaw

Especially since black criminals have so often been characterized as brutish and ignorant, while jewel theft is lionized as a crime for sophisticated masterminds who outsmart authorities (read: smartypants white dudes who do Mission Impossible type shit).

Jul 12 '14

blindbeards0llux:

no mom im not a “shrek fan” im a brogre

Jul 12 '14
ttfkagb:

bklynboihood:

meandmybois:

#OUTINTHENIGHT #NJ4

Anyone got deets on this film?

http://www.outinthenight.com/

FUCK. We need to see this.

ttfkagb:

bklynboihood:

meandmybois:

#OUTINTHENIGHT #NJ4

Anyone got deets on this film?

http://www.outinthenight.com/

FUCK. We need to see this.

(Source: talesfromakennedy)

Jul 8 '14
matzohballsoup:

I totally remember watching this

matzohballsoup:

I totally remember watching this

(Source: statueofimpotentrage)

Jul 7 '14

Tatiana Maslany on the complexity of women in Orphan Black

(Source: thecloneclub)

Jul 7 '14
bleepbloop:

Growing up in the early 80’s I looked up to these women. Dolly, Daisy, Crystal and Jennifer. Oh, I also wanted to be a Solid Gold Dancer.

bleepbloop:

Growing up in the early 80’s I looked up to these women. Dolly, Daisy, Crystal and Jennifer. Oh, I also wanted to be a Solid Gold Dancer.

Jul 6 '14

missdontcare-x:

The women of Orange is the New Black for Emmy magazine

Jul 5 '14
therandomcub:

When digital tv info glitches are more accurate than the actual show info

therandomcub:

When digital tv info glitches are more accurate than the actual show info

Jul 4 '14
blairthornburgh:

smallbeerpress:

July 1, 2014: New edition! Random House has just re-released Magic for Beginners with a newly designed cover and an added conversation between Joe Hill and Kelly Link.
Perfect for readers of George Saunders, Karen Russell, Neil Gaiman, and Aimee Bender, Magic for Beginners is an exquisite, dreamlike dispatch from a virtuoso storyteller who can do seemingly anything. Kelly Link reconstructs modern life through an intoxicating prism, conjuring up unforgettable worlds with humor and humanity. These stories are at once ingenious and deeply moving. They leave the reader astonished and exhilarated.
Kelly Link: website | twitter

I love this book ferociously. It was the only thing I genuinely enjoyed in four years of high-school English reading. I don’t think I would be doing what I do without it.
I taught it to high-school students in a short fiction writing seminar this past spring and they also loved it. Like, came up to me after class to tell me how good it is. They did not know short stories could be that cool, or that short stories could mention Buffy the Vampire Slayer, or that a short story could take the form of a Q&A.We all wished we could watch episodes of “The Library” and we all came up with our own zombie contingency plans. 
And then they wrote really really good fiction. It was so cool. Maybe in ten years they’ll teach it to a new generation of fourteen-year-olds, too.

blairthornburgh:

smallbeerpress:

July 1, 2014: New edition! Random House has just re-released Magic for Beginners with a newly designed cover and an added conversation between Joe Hill and Kelly Link.

Perfect for readers of George Saunders, Karen Russell, Neil Gaiman, and Aimee Bender, Magic for Beginners is an exquisite, dreamlike dispatch from a virtuoso storyteller who can do seemingly anything. Kelly Link reconstructs modern life through an intoxicating prism, conjuring up unforgettable worlds with humor and humanity. These stories are at once ingenious and deeply moving. They leave the reader astonished and exhilarated.

Kelly Link: website | twitter

I love this book ferociously. It was the only thing I genuinely enjoyed in four years of high-school English reading. I don’t think I would be doing what I do without it.

I taught it to high-school students in a short fiction writing seminar this past spring and they also loved it. Like, came up to me after class to tell me how good it is. They did not know short stories could be that cool, or that short stories could mention Buffy the Vampire Slayer, or that a short story could take the form of a Q&A.We all wished we could watch episodes of The Library” and we all came up with our own zombie contingency plans. 

And then they wrote really really good fiction. It was so cool. Maybe in ten years they’ll teach it to a new generation of fourteen-year-olds, too.